A biography of ramses ii an egyptian king

He was one of the most powerful and influential pharaohs of ancient Egypt. He was the third ruler of the 19th Dynasty and ruled for an amazing 67 years, the second longest reign of the ancient Egyptian pharaohs. A variety of health problems such as arthritis and arterial issues may have contributed to the end of the life of Ramses II, but he had accomplished much in his time. Ramses II's interest in architecture resulted in the erection of more monuments than any of the other ancient Egyptian pharaohs.

A biography of ramses ii an egyptian king

He was also responsible for suppressing some Nubian revolts and carrying out a campaign in Libya. Although the Battle of Kadesh often dominates the scholarly view of the military prowess and power of Ramesses II, he nevertheless enjoyed more than a few outright victories over the enemies of Egypt.

His first campaign seems to have taken place in the fourth year of his reign and was commemorated by the erection of what became the first of the Commemorative stelae of Nahr el-Kalb near what is now Beirut.

The inscription is almost totally illegible due to weathering.

A biography of ramses ii an egyptian king

Additional records tell us that he was forced to fight a Canaanite prince who was mortally wounded by an Egyptian archer, and whose army subsequently, was routed.

Ramesses carried off the princes of Canaan as live prisoners to Egypt. Ramesses then plundered the chiefs of the Asiatics in their own lands, returning every year to his headquarters at Riblah to exact tribute. In the fourth year of his reign, he captured the Hittite vassal state of the Amurru during his campaign in Syria.

Battle of Kadesh Ramesses II storming the Hittite fortress of Dapur The Battle of Kadesh in his fifth regnal year was the climactic engagement in a campaign that Ramesses fought in Syria, against the resurgent Hittite forces of Muwatallis. He also constructed his new capital, Pi-Ramesses.

There he built factories to manufacture weapons, chariots, and shields, supposedly producing some 1, weapons in a week, about chariots in two weeks, and 1, shields in a week and a half. After these preparations, Ramesses moved to attack territory in the Levantwhich belonged to a more substantial enemy than any he had ever faced in war: Canaanite princes, seemingly encouraged by the Egyptian incapacity to impose their will and goaded on by the Hittites, began revolts against Egypt.

In the seventh year of his reign, Ramesses II returned to Syria once again. This time he proved more successful against his Hittite foes. During this campaign he split his army into two forces.

It then marched on to capture Moab. The other force, led by Ramesses, attacked Jerusalem and Jericho. He, too, then entered Moab, where he rejoined his son. His armies managed to march as far north as Dapur, [32] where he had a statue of himself erected.

He laid siege to the city before capturing it. His victory proved to be ephemeral. In year nine, Ramesses erected a stele at Beth Shean. After having reasserted his power over Canaan, Ramesses led his army north.

Within a year, they had returned to the Hittite fold, so that Ramesses had to march against Dapur once more in his tenth year. This time he claimed to have fought the battle without even bothering to put on his corsletuntil two hours after the fighting began.

Ramses II | Biography, Achievements, & Facts | vetconnexx.com

He took towns in Retenu[34] and Tunip in Naharin[35] later recorded on the walls of the Ramesseum. The ensuing document is the earliest known peace treaty in world history.

Such dual-language recording is common to many subsequent treaties. This treaty differs from others, in that the two language versions are worded differently. While the majority of the text is identical, the Hittite version says the Egyptians came suing for peace and the Egyptian version says the reverse.

The frontiers are not laid down in this treaty, but may be inferred from other documents. The harbour town of Sumurnorth of Byblosis mentioned as the northern-most town belonging to Egypt, suggesting it contained an Egyptian garrison. The Hittite king encouraged the Babylonian to oppose another enemy, which must have been the king of Assyriawhose allies had killed the messenger of the Egyptian king.

When Ramesses was about 22, two of his own sons, including Amun-her-khepeshefaccompanied him in at least one of those campaigns.Ramesses II / ˈ r æ m ə s iː z, ˈ r æ m s iː z, ˈ r æ m z iː z / (variously also spelt Rameses or Ramses (Ancient Egyptian: rꜥ-ms-sw "Ra is the one who bore him" > Koine Greek: Ῥαμέσσης Rhaméssēs); born c.

BC; died July or August ; reigned –), also known as Ramesses the Great, was the third pharaoh of the Nineteenth Dynasty . Nefertari, also known as Nefertari Meritmut, was an Egyptian queen and the first of the Great Royal Wives (or principal wives) of Ramesses the Great.

Nefertari means 'beautiful companion' and Meritmut means 'Beloved of [the goddess] Mut'. She is one of the best known Egyptian queens, next to Cleopatra, Nefertiti, and vetconnexx.com was highly . Military Leader During his reign as pharaoh, Ramses II led the Egyptian army against several enemies including the Hittites, Syrians, Libyans, and Nubians.

He expanded the Egyptian empire and secured its borders against attackers. Perhaps the most famous battle during Ramses' rule was the Battle of Kadesh.

The concept of monotheism has deep roots in Western Civilization, reaching as far back in time as the New Kingdom of ancient Egypt, well before the formation of the ancient state of Israel or the advent of Christianity.

Background and early years of reign Ramses I was succeeded by his son and coregent, Seti I, who buried his father… Probably descended from a nonroyal military family from the northeast Egyptian delta, Ramses found favour with Horemhebthe last king of the 18th dynasty — bcewho was also a military man.
Ramses II: Military Impact The social classes in ancient Egypt: The nobilitythe intelligentsialabourthe outcast the military and priesthoodsocial stability Search Opening in a new window Printout For best results save the whole page pictures included onto your hard disk, open the page with Word 97 or higher, edit if necessary and print.
People who changed the world | Biography Online Seti provided him with a kingly household and harem, and the young prince accompanied his father on his campaigns, so that when he came to sole rule he already had experience of kingship and of war.

The social classes in ancient Egypt Two ancient views of Egyptian society, the first belonging to a king, Ramses III, who thought of his people as composed of noblemen, administrators, soldiers, personal attendants, and a multitude of citizens..

the princes, and leaders of the land, the infantry and chariotry, the Sherden, the numerous archers, . People who changed the world.

This is a list of people who have changed the world (for better or worse). Also see: People who made a difference and changed the world for the better. People who changed the world.

A biography of ramses ii an egyptian king
Rameses II Biography