The christian and buddhist perspectives on death and the afterlife

This single sentence neatly summarizes the Christian doctrine of atonement, which teaches that the reconciliation of sinful humanity with the God of love was accomplished by God in the sacrifice of His son, Jesus Christ, on the cross. Christianity teaches that God hates sin and will punish the transgressor. It is in the nature of humans to sin, so all people risk separation from God, the source of all life and love. Cut off from God, we suffer anxiety and despair in an insignificant and unhappy life.

The christian and buddhist perspectives on death and the afterlife

Another great article from Buddhism Today teaches about the afterlife in Buddhism. The afterlife usually pertains to the intermediate phase between rebirths. Judaism Traditional Judaism firmly believes that death is not the end of human existence.

However, because Judaism is primarily focused on life here and now rather than on the afterlife, Judaism does not have much dogma about the afterlife, and leaves a great deal of room for personal opinion. It is possible for an Orthodox Jew to believe that the souls of the righteous dead go to a place similar to the Christian heaven, or that they are reincarnated through many lifetimes, or that they simply wait until the coming of the messiah, when they will be resurrected.

I submit that you cannot live the Christian life properly unless you understand the Christian perspective on death. Our views of death must be based on the truthfulness of God’s revelation to us in His Word, not on the speculations of people devoid of God’s Word. Christian beliefs about the afterlife vary between denominations and individual Christians, but the vast majority of Christians believe in some kind of heaven, in which the deceased enjoy the presence of God and loved ones for eternity. Most worldviews must accept their belief in the afterlife on untested faith, but the Christian hope is sure for two reasons; the resurrection of Christ and the testimony of God’s Word. The Bible gives us the true view of what happens after death.

Likewise, Orthodox Jews can believe that the souls of the wicked are tormented by demons of their own creation, or that wicked souls are simply destroyed at death, ceasing to exist.

See Judaism Olam Ha-Ba: Many Muslims believe that the righteous are able to see visions of God after death and that the wicked see visions of hell. Except for these possible visions of heaven or hell, Muslims believe the soul remains in a kind of "soul sleep" until Judgment Day.

When the Day of Judgment arrives, everyone is judged according to their deeds in life.

Afterlife and Salvation

Many Muslims believe that non-Muslims can attain heaven only after a period of purification in the fires of purgatory. In the eighth century, a mystical sect of Islam began which merged the mystical traditions of the Greeks, Buddhists and Hindus with traditional Islamic faith.

Concepts found in Sufism can be found in a great many near-death experiences which have been reported.

The christian and buddhist perspectives on death and the afterlife

The Sufi masters teach that, after death, a person judges himself thereby bringing about their own heaven or hell. Sufism is known as "the Way of the Heart" and the "Way of the Pure. This light concept is common to many other religions as well as the near-death experience.

According to Sufi tradition, there are many ways to ascend, but the essence of the path to God is to find yourself.

As the Sufi saying states, "Know yourself, know your Lord.

Buddhism on the Afterlife - ReligionFacts

Islamic View Hinduism The Upanishads, the ancient set of Hindu religious texts, postulated an eternal, changeless core of the self called as the "Atman. Untouched by the variations of time and circumstance, the Atman was nevertheless entrapped in the world of "samsara" the cycle of death and rebirth.

Unlike Western treatments of reincarnation, which tend to make the idea of coming back into body after body seem exotic, desirable, and even romantic, Hinduism, Buddhism, and other southern Asian religions portray the samsaric process as unhappy.

Life in this world means suffering. What keeps us trapped in the samsaric cycle is the law of karma. In its simplest form, this law operates impersonally like a natural law, ensuring that every good or bad deed eventually returns to the individual in the form of reward or punishment commensurate with the original deed.

Coming back in another lifetime also allows karmic forces to reward or punish one through the circumstances to which one is born. Hence, for example, an individual who was generous in one lifetime might be reborn as a wealthy person in the next incarnation. In the southern Asian religious tradition, it represents the supreme goal of human strivings.

Views on Death According to Different Religions - Religious Movements

Reflecting the diversity of Hinduism, liberation can be attained in a variety of ways, from the proper performance of certain rituals to highly disciplined forms of yoga.Afterlife and Salvation In his letter to the Romans, Paul wrote, "For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord" (Romans ).

This single sentence neatly summarizes the Christian doctrine of atonement, which teaches that the reconciliation of sinful humanity with the God of love was accomplished by God in the sacrifice of His son, Jesus Christ, on the cross.

The christian and buddhist perspectives on death and the afterlife

Christian beliefs about the afterlife vary between denominations and individual Christians, but the vast majority of Christians believe in some kind of heaven, in which the deceased enjoy the presence of God and loved ones for eternity.

Christian beliefs about the afterlife vary between denominations and individual Christians, but the vast majority of Christians believe in some kind of heaven, in which the deceased enjoy the presence of God and loved ones for eternity.

Buddhism on the Afterlife According to Buddhism, after death one is either reborn into another body (reincarnated) or enters nirvana. Only Buddhas (those who . A comprehensive survey of how religions understand death, dying, and the afterlife, drawing on examples from Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Buddhist, and Shamanic perspectives.

Most worldviews must accept their belief in the afterlife on untested faith, but the Christian hope is sure for two reasons; the resurrection of Christ and the testimony of God’s Word.

The Bible gives us the true view of what happens after death.

Major religious traditions of the world contain perspectives of perennial importance on the topic of death and afterlife. Such concepts are not only reflected directly in mortuary and funerary practices, but also inform patterns of beliefs and rituals that shape human lifestyles. Most worldviews must accept their belief in the afterlife on untested faith, but the Christian hope is sure for two reasons; the resurrection of Christ and the testimony of God’s Word. The Bible gives us the true view of what happens after death. Aug 10,  · This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Christianity on the Afterlife - ReligionFacts