The political effects of the jacksonian ideology

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The political effects of the jacksonian ideology

The presidential election of brought a great victory for Andrew Jackson. Not only did he get almost 70 percent of the votes cast in the electoral college, popular participation in the election soared to an unheard of 60 percent.

This more than doubled the turnout in ; Jackson clearly headed a sweeping political movement. His central message remained largely the same from the previous election, but had grown in intensity. Jackson warned that the nation had been corrupted by "special privilege," characterized especially by the policies of the Second Bank of the United States.

The proper road to reform, according to Jackson, lay in an absolute acceptance of majority rule as expressed through the democratic process.

Beyond these general principles, however, Jackson's campaign was notably vague about specific policies. Instead, it stressed Jackson's life story as a man who had risen from modest origins to become a successful Tennessee planter. Jackson's claim to distinction lay in a military career that included service as a young man in the Revolutionary War, several anti-Indian campaigns, and, of course, his crowning moment in the Battle of New Orleans at the end of the War of Jackson's election marked a new direction in American politics.

What Impact on the Country Did the Jacksonian Democracy Have? | Synonym

He was the first westerner elected president, indeed, the first president from a state other than Virginia or Massachusetts. He boldly proclaimed himself to be the "champion of the common man" and believed that their interests were ignored by the aggressive national economic plans of Clay and Adams.

More than this, however, when Martin Van Buren followed Jackson as president, it indicated that the Jacksonian movement had long-term significance that would outlast his own charismatic leadership.

Andrew Jackson is known to have harbored animosity for Native Americans. During his administration, many tribes were moved to reservations in the Oklahoma Territory. Van Buren, perhaps even more than Jackson, helped to create the new Democratic party that centered upon three chief qualities closely linked to Jacksonian Democracy.

First, it declared itself to be the party of ordinary farmers and workers. Second, it opposed the special privileges of economic elites. Third, to offer affordable western land to ordinary white Americans, Indians needed to be forced further westward.

The Whig party soon arose to challenge the Democrats with a different policy platform and vision for the nation.

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Whigs' favored active government support for economic improvement as the best route to sustained prosperity. Thus, the Whig-Democrat political contest was in large part a disagreement about the early Industrial Revolution. Whigs defended economic development's broad benefits, while Democrats stressed the new forms of dependence that it created.

The fiercely partisan campaigns waged between these parties lasted into the s and are known as the Second Party System, an assuredly modern framework of political competition that reached ordinary voters as never before with both sides organizing tirelessly to carry their message directly to the American people.Jacksonian Democrats expanded suffrage for white males in order to gain votes.

Another way to gain power in Congress was the use of Patronage which was a policy of placing political supporters in office.

The political effects of the jacksonian ideology

Although, the Jacksonian Period celebrated the common man through political enfranchisement and reform, the era did limit the inclusion of non-white males. One of the most remarkable changes surrounding the Jacksonian Period was the advent of universal white male suffrage. Jefferson also felt that the central government should be "rigorously frugal and simple." As president he reduced the size and scope of the federal government by ending internal taxes, reducing the size of the army and navy, and paying off the government's debt.

His political ideology was rooted in a belief in the sovereignty of the people's will—and for the people's will to be sovereign there had to be a corresponding commitment to majority rule.

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If minorities could simply reject or withdraw from the will of the majority, the people's will would have no meaning. Historians and political scientists consider the Second Party System to be a term of periodization to designate the political party system operating in the United States from about to , after the First Party System ended.

The system was characterized by rapidly rising levels of voter interest, beginning in , as demonstrated by Election Day turnouts, rallies, partisan newspapers. Van Buren, perhaps even more than Jackson, helped to create the new Democratic party that centered upon three chief qualities closely linked to Jacksonian Democracy.

The political effects of the jacksonian ideology

First, it declared itself to be the party of ordinary farmers and workers. Second, it opposed the special privileges of economic elites.

Jacksonian democracy - Wikipedia