Wordsworths i wandered lonely as a cloud and clarkes miracle on saint davids day essay

WALKIRK very soon discovered that I had no intention whatever of giving up the writing of my book, and I quieted the fears of my grandmother, in regard to my health, by assuring her that the sedentary work connected with the pro- duction of my volume would not be done by me.

Wordsworths i wandered lonely as a cloud and clarkes miracle on saint davids day essay

Studies on Homer and the Homeric Age.

Wordsworths i wandered lonely as a cloud and clarkes miracle on saint davids day essay

THESE volumes, which carry us back among the heroes and gods of an age that can never be forgotten, and which serve to guide us in the study of the two greatest productions of the human mind, possess an interest and attraction quite unusual in critical treatises on the Greek classics.

The author appears not only as a careful student, but also as an ardent ad- mirer of the works he has undertaken to elucidate, and has infused a life and vigor into the discussions of those topics, which, having usually fallen into the hands of mere scholars, are by general readers considered as little better than the offal of literature, and left for these greedy vultures to prey upon undisturbed.

That such a work as Mr. Gladstone has here presented to us has long been needed, no admirer of Homer will deny, and it will be generally conceded that the work has been executed with rare ability. In his Introductory Chapter the author considers the posi- tion which ought to be assigned to the Homeric poems in a classical education; and he finds reason to lament the neglect shown them in the English Universities.

The reasons he ad- vances for a more extended study of these poems are mainly such as relate to the information they afford regarding the VOL. Greek language, history, and progress. They furnish the reader with ideas which will remain fresh and well defined long after his thorough knowledge of the early variations and the different dialects of the Greek tongue shall have grown vague, and his intimate acquaintance with the rise and progress of the tribes shall have become too general to be exact.

It seems clear that what is most wanted is a thorough understanding of the poetry, rather than of the age, of Homer; a knowledge of the design and plot of his epics, rather than of the ethnology of the Greeks; a familiarity with the personages and mythology, rather than with the geography or political movements, of the time.

To this part of the work, therefore, we turn with the greatest interest, and cannot but regret to find these topics so briefly treated. The religion of the poems is, indeed, thor- oughly discussed, but the remaining subjects we have men- tioned are rather hastily passed over.

Get help with your homework The daffodil photos are lovely and inspiring
Found what you're looking for? Ashley Kannan Certified Educator The strongest element of comparison between both poems is how the natural world is used to evoke a more profound condition of being. Frost uses the natural elements of fire and ice to discuss issues of desire and destruction.

Another branch of inquiry is suggested in this connection. These poems, produced as they were in the infancy of Grecian civilization, and first systematizing the national religion as well as celebrating the national heroes, exerted a powerful influence upon the Greeks themselves. Considered merely in reference to language, Homers verse holds nearly the place in the his- tory of Greece which King Jamess Bible translation holds in that of England.

Nor is this the only point of resemblance between the two. Both modelled the religious belief, and hence in a great degree determined the manners and civiliza- tion, of their respective countries; both have furnished an inexhaustible supply of subjects for literature and art; and both have shaped the minds and directed the councils of those men of each country who have most powerfully influenced the national character.

On the one hand we might mention, as an instance in point, the Puritans, in whom an excessive adherence to the manners of the Old Testament, and to the strict auster- ity of life which they supposed to be taught in the New, arose from the deepest reverence and the most sincere love of their sacred Scriptures; while on the other we might name the That it was great very great can- not be denied, and, commencing to exert itself at the very dawn of civilization, it must have directed and controlled the expanding powers of the growing people.

Now the importance of the Greeks in the development of modern society is by no means insignificant.

I wandered lonely as a cloud and Clarkes Miracle on Saint David’s Day | Essay Writing Service A+

At the time of the introduction of Christianity, we find three nationalities gathered upon the shores of the Mediterranean, and destined to perform an important, but for each a separate and peculiar part, in the promulgation of the new religion. After this work is finished, they all disappear from history.

First, we have the Jews, who are the religious element in the admixture of nations, and among whom the new belief took its rise. Their mission closed shortly after its introduction, and they are soon removed from the stage.

Wordsworths i wandered lonely as a cloud and clarkes miracle on saint davids day essay

The second of these nation- alities is that of the IRomans, who represent the element of power. Their extended empire affords a ready means for the spread of the new faith throughout the known world.

What they bequeath to modern society is law and a system of gov- ernment, organically complete, yet needing to have its despotic tendencies modified by the inbreathing of the spirit of free- dom.Read the excerpt.

From “I Wandered Lonely As a Cloud” by William Wordsworth I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o’er vales and hills, When all - 38 5/5(1). View the 'Manuscript of 'I wandered lonely as a cloud' by William Wordsworth' on the British Library's Discovering Literature website.

The title ‘I wandered lonely as a cloud,’ says a lot about the poem, especially as it is also the first line. It immediately starts off the poem with a sense of inner disharmony, shown by the words ‘wandered’, ‘lonely’ and ‘cloud’.

Mar 03,  · Wordsworth published his poem, " I wandered lonely as a Cloud,", Daffodils, in Wordsworth later altered the poem Daffodils, and his second version, published in , is the one widely known vetconnexx.coms: A comparison of Wordsworth’s ‘Iwandered lonely as a cloud’ and Clarkes ‘Miracle on Saint David’s Day’.

The title ‘I wandered lonely as a cloud,’ says a lot about the poem, especially as it is also the first line. A comparison of Wordsworth's 'Iwandered lonely as a cloud' and Clarkes 'Miracle on Saint David's Day'. The title 'I wandered lonely as a cloud,' says a lot about the poem, especially as it is also the first line.

I wandered lonely as a cloud and Clarkes Miracle on Saint David’s Day | Essay Writing Service A+